scandalousgaijin:

scandalousgaijin:

Utaha Kasumigaoka

Nicole Jean Marie

Nicole Jean Marie

Photo

Photo

Hiya! I’m planning on a Part 8 Josuke (his main outfit) cosplay from JJBA and I was wondering if I could get some advice on how to do this characters embellishments. In some reference photos, they look like embroidered fabric, other pictures make it look as if they’re more like badges. What would look better on a sailor uniform? Thank you in advance!!

Hello there!

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One of the great and terrible things about Jojo is that accuracy isn’t too much of a thing, since Araki is…well, Araki. Besides that color accuracy barely exists in the series, he draws the characters with subtle variations to their outfits all the time (common in anime art generally), so each cover image, splash page, etc. might have a different look. Gappy is notorious for having some of the more subtle variations to his outfit versions. The good thing about all this? It’s Jojo. You can do what you want. Everything is made up and the colors don’t matter.

For Jo2uke specifically, whether the badges are sewn or separate badges is a matter of taste.

There are three main ways I can think of to go about them:

– Applique flat onto the top. This will be a bit flatter and more cartoony in appearance, but will move with the shirt, and you can use varying fabric textures to create an appealing look.

– Dimensional applique. You can applique them, but place batting or another material behind the fabric, between the stitches, to create a dimensional look to the fabric. You can also make them like this and then attach them separately to the garment rather than sewing directly on.

– Separate badges. These you would make flat, perhaps out of foam or plastic, and pin to the garment. This would create the look of the badges being separate from the rest of the garment.

Personally, I find that Araki’s art errs on the side of them moving separately from the shirt, so if I were doing this, I’d either do a dimensional applique or separate badges that pin on. The round emblem in particular seems to move separately, and the anchor is sometimes drawn as more flexible and curved to his body/the shirt, and sometimes stiffer. Whatever you do, I’d keep it consistent between the two emblems.

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff

(PS: You have excellent taste in Jojo parts ;])

donshofer: 是魚呀

donshofer:

是魚呀

Regular

For a Fan

If any of you Cosplayers out there want to submit a picture of them doing a cosplay while holding a sign that Says “Cosplay-is-Right” I will make you my header on this blog. Submit in messages 🙂

donshofer: 星之迟迟

donshofer:

星之迟迟

Hey there! I’m going to cosplay sally face to a con in a few weeks and I’m a bit stumped. I’ve got everything ready, except the mask. I bought a blank mask at a craft store and painted it. However, it looks a bit silly and plasticy. How can I make it look realistic and used? Thank you in advance! ♥♥

Hello there!

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There are several ways you can make something look old and worn, and often you can get the best effect by using multiple techniques. Here are a few ideas:

– Using a matte coat over the mask will make it less shiny, and thus look less new. You can use a matte clear coat over any other weathering you do to protect it, as well.

– Painting on some weathering can get you some interesting effects, and is probably the most common way to make things look worn. Think about where a real mask like that would collect dirt, where it would be handled more and thus be worn down in those places, etc. Dry brushing on paint is a great way to make it look like the item has collected dirt. You can also use a paint wash around areas that would need greater shadow detailing to make them look less flat, and even use some stippling techniques to get a texture similar to that of the artwork. Try experimenting with a few techniques and see what works best for you.

– A crackle glaze can give a more ceramic-like look. This is especially effective if you mix it with a very small amount of a brown or grey, or if you use a very light wash of similar tones over it once dry and wipe it away, since this makes the crackle effect more prominent. The thicker you apply the crackle coat, the larger the cracks and the spaces between them will be – a thin coat can create small cracks that aren’t noticeable from afar except for adding texture.

– You can also try lightly dyeing the plastic with a polyester dye. Use a very small amount and short time as to not change the mask from noticeably white, but instead use just enough to make it look old and dingy. Grey tones and slight yellow tones work well for old plastic looks.

– Finally, you can abrade the mask with a bit of fine-grit sandpaper if you want visible scuff marks. Be careful not to sand too hard. This will work best if doing it before some of the methods that color the mask, since the color will collect in the abrasions and make them more pronounced.

Here is also a list of our weathering tutorials on the website.

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff

Regular

cosplayheaven69:

Cosplayer: Kurichan Cosplay.

Country: Italy.

Cosplay: 2B from NieR: Automata.

Photos by: @fotomania.biz

https://instagram.com/kurichan.cosplay

@kurichancosplay

Regular

cosplayheaven69:

Cosplayer: Luxlo Cosplay.

Country: Canada.

Cosplay: Tharja from Fire Emblem.

Photo by: @dream_land_photography89

https://www.instagram.com/luxlocosplay/