Category: asks

Hey there! I’m going to cosplay sally face to a con in a few weeks and I’m a bit stumped. I’ve got everything ready, except the mask. I bought a blank mask at a craft store and painted it. However, it looks a bit silly and plasticy. How can I make it look realistic and used? Thank you in advance! ♥♥

Hello there!

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There are several ways you can make something look old and worn, and often you can get the best effect by using multiple techniques. Here are a few ideas:

– Using a matte coat over the mask will make it less shiny, and thus look less new. You can use a matte clear coat over any other weathering you do to protect it, as well.

– Painting on some weathering can get you some interesting effects, and is probably the most common way to make things look worn. Think about where a real mask like that would collect dirt, where it would be handled more and thus be worn down in those places, etc. Dry brushing on paint is a great way to make it look like the item has collected dirt. You can also use a paint wash around areas that would need greater shadow detailing to make them look less flat, and even use some stippling techniques to get a texture similar to that of the artwork. Try experimenting with a few techniques and see what works best for you.

– A crackle glaze can give a more ceramic-like look. This is especially effective if you mix it with a very small amount of a brown or grey, or if you use a very light wash of similar tones over it once dry and wipe it away, since this makes the crackle effect more prominent. The thicker you apply the crackle coat, the larger the cracks and the spaces between them will be – a thin coat can create small cracks that aren’t noticeable from afar except for adding texture.

– You can also try lightly dyeing the plastic with a polyester dye. Use a very small amount and short time as to not change the mask from noticeably white, but instead use just enough to make it look old and dingy. Grey tones and slight yellow tones work well for old plastic looks.

– Finally, you can abrade the mask with a bit of fine-grit sandpaper if you want visible scuff marks. Be careful not to sand too hard. This will work best if doing it before some of the methods that color the mask, since the color will collect in the abrasions and make them more pronounced.

Here is also a list of our weathering tutorials on the website.

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff

Hi there! I plan on making Ochako’s formal outfit from the BNHA movie that’s currently out, however I’m not sure what kind of fabric to use for the dress itself. Any suggestions/tips would be extremely helpful!

Hello there!

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Since this is a formal outfit, I would recommend formal materials.

My first pick would be taffeta, because this would get the crispness and volume of her skirt (with a petticoat and a proper double circle skirt cut). You can also go with a dull satin or a sanded satin, though you may need to interface this to get the crispness of her bodice.

Be sure to fit the bodice well, use interfacing in the collar, and add boning to the bodice to create a smoother line.

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff

Do you know anything for making like…. lightweight, large jingle-bells? (I hope this makes sense) I’ve seen some for sale but they’re not quite as big as I need them to be for the cosplay.

Hello there!

You have a few options for making fake ones, if you can’t find the size you need:

– Find plastic globes and cut out the slit shapes. A hot knife used carefully in a well-ventilated area would be a good tool to use for that. You can then paint them the color you need.

– Seal and paint styrofoam spheres. I would look for the smoothfoam rather than the bumpy kind with all the holes, and use spackle (sanded down after each coat) for smoothness.

– If you can find hemispheres (of foam, of plastic, etc.) or make them, you can attach them together at the center to do the same. These will be more easy to store if you need very large bells, since if you make the center attachment detachable, you can take them apart and store them stacked inside each other.

– If you need something very lightweight and large, you may be able to use vinyl inflatable balls, though these will be much harder (or nearly impossible) to paint if you need a metallic color

– If you need a very large size, you can use a fabric in the color you need and make plush bells. Look for ball patterns to get the proper roundness. If you need metallic-looking bells, you can use a metallic spandex or vinyl, and then applique on the slits.

Finally, if the bells are a somewhat reasonable size, look for bells sold for fans of the book Polar Express. You can get them up to a few inches in diameter, and then if you need to disallow the ringing, fill them with a bit of hot glue. I’ve used these on a costume before, though I didn’t need anything hugely oversized (not like Deijiko from DigiCharat or anything haha).

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff

I’m doing a Caleb Widogast cosplay and I’m trying to make his coat. I have a pattern but I’m not sure what kind of fabric to use for the coat. I don’t want it to look bad but I know absolutely nothing about fabric, what would you recommend fabric wise for the coat?

Hello there!

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When it comes to fabric choice, it’s less an exact science than getting to know what would work, and there’s a few ways to go about finding the perfect material. One method would be to look at real-life garments that are similar and what they are made out of. You don’t need to know the names of the fabrics, but look at weight, texture, and other qualities, and then go to a fabric store and find materials that have similar characteristics. This is a great way to learn, and you’ll really get a feel for what works and what doesn’t for certain items.

You can also look at the back of your pattern envelope for suggestions – it’ll tell you some fabric names, and you can then go to a fabric store, find materials with those names, and see what they look and feel like. This is another good way to quickly learn, and can be a great starting point when overwhelmed, but keep in mind that the perfect fabric may not be suggested on the envelope because they’re just that: suggestions. (and suggestions assuming real-life garments, in most cases!)

Once you get a bit more advanced with fabrics, you can look at the garment and the world it comes from and ask yourself what materials would work there. For this garment, it appears to be something grungy and heavily weathered, and the garment is realistic in appearance, so something with a realistic texture (so not something super flat looking) and that can withstand your weathering would be best. Also look at where the character wears this – is the world one with mostly natural materials? What does the character do in this garment? This can help you narrow down your options once you have a few.

That said, here are my suggestions of things to look at.

The first fabric I would look at is a faux suede. The coat appears to be lined in fur, and it would make sense that the outside of the jacket in-universe is the backside of the fur. The suede would also keep the animal-based look uniform, and create a nice texture. Make sure to pay extra attention to pattern placement with a material like this, so that the nap of the suede is in a consistent direction once sewn.

Faux leather would be another, similar option, for similar reasons, though is more difficult to sew and a heavier material. Be sure to invest in a non-stick/Teflon foot for your sewing machine if you go this route.

If you want something that is suitable but not suede- or leather-like in appearance, there are many fabrics in the suitings and bottomweights category that would work for this. Look for something like a medium-weight twill with a high cotton or other natural fiber content, or something like a denim (which is a type of twill). A melton might also be good, though pricey. I wouldn’t recommend anything as soft as a gabardine.

Whatever you choose, it needs to be able to handle the weathering you are planning on doing, so get a swatch or buy a small amount and try any sort of painting, ripping, abrading, etc. you are planning on doing, and see how the fabric reacts.

I hope that helps! Good luck :] 

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff

I would like to remind our lovely followers who are asking help questions that our submit is open!…

I would like to remind our lovely followers who are asking help questions that our submit is open! We can’t know every character or series, and sometimes the correct outfit is difficult to find in a google search, so sending an ask alongside a submit with a reference image or two is very useful, so that you can be sure that your question is answered properly.

Happy cosplaying!

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff

Hey there! I want to cosplay a Banana Guard from Adventure Time, which seemed simple, but then I realized I dont know how to go about the legs. My initial idea was to use foam to make them look flat like popsicle sticks, but to make them all one piece would mean sacrificing movement in my knees. Any alternatives that wouldnt hinder movement?

Hello there!

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I can think of a couple of solutions that you could try, depending on the effect you want and how much trouble you want to go through.

The simplest would be to wear tan-colored tights, possibly painting a light wood grain on them for effect. This won’t create the flat popsicle stick effect, but it will create a wood effect.

If you want to appear flat, you can make piece like armor pieces that don’t curve around your leg, but are jointed at the knee. These would attach with straps around your legs and be flat on the front side, so you would only be able to pose at specific angles. I would do a flat piece for the thigh, a piece for the knecap, and a piece for the shin, though you may be able to lengthen the thigh piece enough to cover the knee without hindering movement. If you can make these pieces line up in a way that makes them appear flat, such as having them able to interlock, that would be best.

If you wanted them to appear flat from the side but not the front, all you would need is a single joint (think like a brad holding together two pieces of paper) that the pieces can rotate around as you move.

If you don’t mind some degree of encumberment to your movement and want a very flat look, you can create flat pieces that go from your hip to just above your ankle but are only attached to your thigh. When you walk, your calves will be free, though you will have a large, stiff board in front of your leg and will need to still be careful. (I may have just walked around my room a few times with a roll of foam strapped to my thigh to test the feasibility of this – not ideal movement, but not as bad as expected as long as it doesn’t get in the way of your hip joints.)

For materials: cardboard or foamboard or is a good, cheap, lightweight standby. Not the sturdiest, but also won’t hurt if something goes wrong with bending. EVA foam/craft foam would also work, but would need to be prevented from curling or bending. Plastics will be stiffer and more durable, but will also be heavier and might hurt if you walk into something or someone. A thin, lightweight wood (like balsa) would be stiff and have the most realism in texture, but won’t be as sturdy.

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff

I’m doing a Masquerade ball Nadia from the game The Arcana, but I’m not sure how to do her little sash thing for her top. Any ideas?

Hello there!

Is this the correct outfit?

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I’m not sure which sash you’re referring to, so I’ll explain everything sash-like that I see.

For the gold-colored tie around her waist, this is a simple rectangle of fabric sewn into a tube, pressed flat, and tied around the waist. I would recommend a bias cut on the fabric so that it gets the same drape. You will want to cut your rectangle twice as wide as you want the width of the finished sash, plus an inch for seam allowance, and then fold it in half lengthwise and sew the short ends together, and the long ends together, leaving a gap of a few inches. You can then turn this right-side out, handsew the gap shut, and press.

For the green draped garment, this will require a bit more patterning. If you are able to create a pattern by draping fabric over yourself/a friend/a dressform, I would recommend that. The pattern appears to be comprised of long rectangles sewn together in the back, belted at the waist, and draped off the shoulders, but try experimenting with shapes to get the exact shape.

For the structure of this piece, you will want to add mid-weight interfacing to the top portion, and possibly some horsehair braid to the very top edge for it to stand outward like that. If you need it to stay up better, you can sew it to a garment or straps that hug your arms/shoulders (I would do a spandex inner sleeve) so that the top of the draped portion is able to stand away from your body without falling.

If it is something else you are having trouble with, let me know and I’ll try to find a solution. :]

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff

Hiya! I’m pulling together a Misa Amane costume for an anime convention in May (but if I can get it done fast I want to use it for Halloween) and I’m terrible with makeup. Idk how to achieve her shiny lip look without gloss but since she’s got long hair it would keep getting stuck with gloss, which is really annoying. Also I have freckles and dark brows, and idk how to make myself look more natural as a blonde. Any advice?

Hello there!

For the makeup, you have a few options:

– use a satin finish lipstick for a bit of gloss but without as much stickiness as a lip gloss might have, or see if you can find a liquid lipstick with a shiny instead of matte finish

– find a gloss without much stickiness to it. Some glosses are stickier than others, so a lip oil product or a gloss that’s higher quality and less sticky would be a good choice.

– be careful to keep your hair out of your face throughout the day

– Use a lip stain instead of a stick or a gloss and forget about the finish not being the same

To me, her lip makeup looks like a lipstick with shine to it rather than a gloss, especially because of the deep red color. I would recommend filling in lips all the way with a lipliner (clear or matching the stick), and then applying lipstick with a lip brush to ensure longevity of color. Powdering your lips can make the stick last longer, but will get rid of any shine. Go to a makeup store that has testers and test the color on the back of your hand to check for texture and finish, and see what the store’s return policy is if you end up not liking the color. Even within the same product line in the same brand, finishes, longevity, and texture can vary depending on the color.

As for your brows, you can recolor them! Here is a list of tutorials on how to do so  – YMMV on different techniques. (I personally use a large white eye pencil brushed through my brows with eyeshadow on top when going blonde.) I would recommend going a bit darker than your wig color for your brows, since brows tend to naturally be a bit darker than head hair.

For freckles, I personally wouldn’t worry, but if you want to cover them, make sure you use a foundation with a high enough coverage. Cream-based products set with powder tend to have higher coverage than powder or liquid products. You can also use a lighter coverage foundation if you just want to lighten them.

Be sure that when choosing a blonde wig, you choose one that works with your skintone and your undertones to make it look the most natural.

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff

Hello there!! I’m trying to cosplay Clea from the Doctor Strange comics for Anime USA and I’m kinda stumped as to what I should do about her shoulder pads and bodysuit? Any Suggestions!?

Hello there!

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This, to me, looks like it would be easiest to do with a leotard over another bodysuit, rather than making it all in one piece. 

You can purchase a black unitard and a wet look or mystique purple leotard, and then modify them, or you can sew one or both pieces yourself so you have access to a greater range of materials and custom fit. You can find commercial patterns for stretch bodysuits and leotards – look in the costume or dancewear section of the catalog.

If you choose to purchase, you can create the patterns on her arms and legs with metallic fabric paint. Be sure that the bodysuit is stretched as you paint (such as wearing it or placing it on a form – if you wear it, saran wrap yourself first to prevent paint transfer) so that the size will be correct once the paint dries, and so the proportions are correct.

You can also applique the pattern on. I would recommend a metallic spandex for the shiny effect and stretch Heat N Bond to fuse it to the main fabric (you probably won’t even need to sew down the edges). I would recommend doing this before you sew the bodysuit together.

A cursory search hasn’t turned up any materials with a similar print, but if you want to search for yourself, you may find something close enough.

For the shoulderpads, I would recommend creating basically trapezoid shapes out of a shiny metallic spandex and then quilting in the lines. You can do this by gluing the fabric to EVA foam/craft foam on the backside, or you can use a quilt batting material and sew the lines to create the puffy effect. You can then sew this to the shoulders of your leotard.

I hope that helps! good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff

Hey, any idea on how to make a keyblade? Thanks

Hello there!

We have a section on keyblades here.

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff