Category: asks

I would look for a “large sunhat” or “wide brim sunhat” which should give you the shape you are looking for. You should be able to find a black one pretty easily, but you could also colour one using paint or dye (depending on the material.)

Maybe you want to make the hat from scratch? If so, check out this tutorial. If you are making the brim quite large, you will need something to support it so it sits right. I recommend a heavier weight interfacing or buckram or running a wire in the outside-edge of the brim, between the layers of fabric.She has some decorations attached to the hat as well. You can easily add these yourself by gluing them to the base-hat, attaching them to a ribbon that ties around the hat, or poking them through the straw of a straw hat.

Stick: You could use an actual stick for the stick, or you could get the exact shape by creating your own. You could make it out of worbla, 3D print it or wrap tape around a wire. Floral departments of craft stores might have real or fake sticks you could use as well.

Fluff: Fur or feathers can be used to get a fluffly look. If you want something more stiff you could use foam. Fabric might also be an option if you’re looking for a different texture.

Hope this helps!— Duckie | Admin | Support the Blog (Ko-Fi)

Hello there!

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That texture is quite interesting! There’s a few ways I can see to go about this.

First of all, the pattern of the sleeves themselves. They appear to be vertically pleated, which is an usual style. I would pattern these like you would a pleated skirt, only you are going to need to deal with the curve of the sleeve cap. Basically, vertically slash a straight, dartless sleeve pattern at even intervals where you want the pleats to go, spread the pieces apart in the distance you need (these are box pleats, so pleat depth x 2 for the sides + however wide you want the “bottom” of the pleat), and then redraw the curve of the cap to fit the new size and shape.

For the texture, you can either buy a fabric with a texture or you can create a fabric with a texture. Chenille or corduroy with the wale running horizontally would work well, as would a synthetic fabric with a pre-pressed “crinkle” effect. You might also get lucky and find a really textured dupioni that could work. If you want to create the pattern yourself, you can use dye to create a simulation of texture (possibly by doing rough accordion pleats on green fabric and then dipping in black?), or you can pleat or melt fabric in a way that gets you that texture. If you don’t want to deal with all that, raw silk/silk noil might make an interesting texture, though not entirely accurate. I would say that the more inherent texture to the fabric you use, the better in this case.

Personally? I would go with a chenille or a corduroy with a wide (lower number) wale (the the lines running through it), since the rest of the outfit gives off the kind of vibe where a rich, fall fabric would make sense.

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff / Twitter

Hello there!

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Ah yes, the old not caring about gravity when making a character design issue.

Mostly for this kind of outfit, you are going to need to add a lot of extra structure. This can come in the form of boning, interfacing, horsehair braid, wire, or any other item that can be inserted into the fabric to make it stiffer and behave more to your will.

The sleeves are going to be a bit tricky in how they are patterned, since they don’t have visible gathers. You can either add gathers to the bottom where they will attach to a separate piece for the lower arm, or you can leave it ungathered and add a panel in order to bridge the two, much like how lantern sleeves are constructed.

As for keeping them off your shoulders, I would recommend a heavy interfacing and some sort of still material in the open edge. It would be even sturdier if you continued that stiff material in through the top neckline edge of the jacket. Horsehair braid is a good option, but if that ends up not being sturdy enough for your tastes, soft plastic boning (the cheap stuff, not anything like German plastic or synthetic whalebone) inserted into the edge would work quite well. If you have issues keeping the sleeves up, they can be attached, either permanently or with hidden snaps on the inside, to the pink undershirt.

The skirt is also tricky, but the main issue you will have will likely be keeping the petal shape, not keeping the poof. There are going to be at least two parts to the structure of the skirt: an underlayer that holds the petals out away from your body, and structure within the petals that keep their curved shape and allow them to fall in that lovely egg shape around your body.

For the underlayer, I would recommend a small petticoat. Be sure to get or make one with more of a bell shape than an A-line shape, because this will help support the top of the skirt as well as the bottom. Thankfully, the front of the skirt is closed above the knee or mid thigh (depending on how you are proportioning this to yourself), so you can easily hide a support garment underneath. 

For the shape of the petals, you will need to do a few things. First is to make sure you pattern them so that they retain a curved shape on their own – the inside of the petal is going to be larger than the outside edge. This is simple enough on the petals that are split between the two shades of pink down the center, since you can simply make the two pieces curved, sew them together, and have a curved shape. The pattern will look roughly like this, though be sure to do some tests at small scale to ensure the proper curvature:

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(ignore that my handwriting is terrible!)

You can see here that the middle seam is curved to allow more space inside of there than a simple straight seam would allow – this is what creates the curve of the petal. It’s the same principle as a princess seam or any other curved seam that creates fullness.

For the front petals with asymmetrical seamlines, you will need to play with the patterns a LOT to create fullness in the top portion without adding too much fullness near the sides. On these, I would recommend also creating a vertical seam on the light pink portions, running from the tip of the petal to the seam that attaches it to the dark pink (so about halfway up the petal), so that you can shape it with the fullness that you need. These petals would then be three pieces (two light, one dark) rather than two. I would personally pattern the symmetrical petals first and then modify a copy of that pattern by slicing along the curve where the dark meets the light and adding seam allowance to that edge. This will ensure the same shape as the other petals and save you a bit of time on trying to get those curves correct!

The petals themselves are also going to need some structure in order to keep their shape. Interfacing will help quite a bit. You can also experiment with a few things, which will give you a few different effects: running a length of plastic boning down the center, running a length of wire down the center, running a length of wire around the outside edge.

The boning would be the most “bouncy” of the structures, and would be the first thing I would go with. Wire down the center would be a hybrid. Wire around the edges would be stiffest, but would also be the most posable. Be sure to get a wire that won’t discolor your fabric over time, like a millinery wire, which is intended for use next to fabric. If you are finding that the petals tend to collapse with only a center support, you can also try a center support and a V-shaped support, with the lines of the V running from the point, through the centers of the panels, and then to the waist.

This skirt is going to be heavy and cumbersome pretty much no matter what you do, so be sure to give the waistband good support!

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff / Twitter

Hello there!

What I would recommend isn’t spraypaint, but rather a leather paint. The difference is that leather paint is soft and flexible and can adhere well to the types of materials that shoes are made out of, where spray paint is not at all flexible and will flake off easily.

Angelus brand leather paint is very popular, comes in many colors, and can be purchased at most US craft stores, and the brand I would recommend.

If you absolutely have to spray paint, I would get Designmaster Colortool spray, which is meant for faux flowers, since it will be softer and more flexible than other spray paints, though it still won’t have quite the effect of a leather paint.

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff / Twitter

Hello there!

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Thankfully, since distressed jeans are fashionable, there are TONS of guides out there on how to do it! Here’s a few methods you may find helpful:

Creating patches of horizontal white threading

Fraying with a razor

Light bleach wash and sandpaper

You can also use heavier grits of sandpaper (lower numbers) and elbow grease to not just soften, but to actually wear holes through the jeans.

Make sure you concentrate the distressing on areas that jeans would naturally get distressed – the fronts of the thighs, the knees, around areas that are on the tops of folds and creases (rather than inside the folds and creases) when worn, around the pocket openings and the bottom hems, etc.

Have fun with it! I hope that helps :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff / Twitter

Hello there!

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There’s a few ways you can go about her corset.

Perhaps the easiest would be to simply purchase an off-the-rack underbust corset and modify it as needed. Even though you won’t likely be looking to actually reduce your waist, I would still look for one with steel boning and a curvy enough cut that it will conform to your underbust and hips while still defining your waist and not creating gaps. Remember that the lacing should be parallel in the back! Here’s a good guide to the basics.

Another option would be to make an underbust corset. It doesn’t have to be extremely complicated, since you likely aren’t going to want to tightlace with it, but still be sure to use a firm fabric and high-quality boning – I typically recommend spiral steel for the bendy areas like the waist and flat spring steel for the areas like the center front – since a lot of cheap plastic boning can warp and twist and become very uncomfortable. Making your own would allow you to customize the fit and the detailing in a way that purchasing would not. Even a basic pattern found in the costuming section of a major commercial pattern manufacturer’s catalog would work well for this, since you don’t need tightlacing or historical accuracy. Thankfully, costume corset patterns are very common these days!

Lastly, you can make a faux corset out of a stretchy fabric and enough boning for structure, but not the same amount or type you would use for a full corset. I would recommend using a stretch interfacing on your fabric if you go this route, as it helps create a bit more firmness and control. This would be the least corset-like, but would move in the same way hers seems to. It also would take less skill in getting a precise fit, though you would need to know how to work with stretch fabrics. I would recommend a boning like rigilene for this option.

Any of these options can either have the panty area attached to the corset or as a separate piece worn underneath.

For the front detailing, I would recommend creating the neck piece as a separate item and then having it snap to the front of the corset rather than sewing in on. This will allow you to dress and undress easier than if it were attached, and if you needed to remove the neck piece for any reason, you wouldn’t need to remove your whole costume. If you have a pre-made corset or if you make a corset with a busk in the front, you can use the detailing to cover the busk and hide it. The red gems can simply be sewn or glued over where the snaps are.

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff / Twitter

Hello there!

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For her vest, I would recommend basing it off of a pattern for a button-down shirt with a collar. You would be able to crop the pattern to the correct length and simply leave off any sleeves included in the pattern. The buttons can be replaced with snaps – look for some with pearlized backs to them for the same effect as her vest. You will likely need a pair of eyelet/snap pliers in order to apply these, and may need to cut tiny holes in the p/leather for the prongs to go through before crimping.

You can use either a real leather or a faux leather for this project, depending on what you have access to and are comfortable working with. Be sure the material is soft and pliable enough to drape around your body, but not so thin that it doesn’t have the same effect as the render – it needs to plausibly look like a jacket material. Either way, be sure to stock up on some leather needles for your sewing machine to ensure the material can be punched through, and if possible, get a teflon/nonstick foot for your machine so you can do all the required topstitching without the material sticking to the foot. Note that with both of these materials, any holes or marks you make will not self heal with with regular fabrics, meaning that the holes will be permanent. Be sure to make a mockup or two and then mark your stitching lines on the actual material with something easy to remove (such as tailor’s chalk – test anything you use on a scrap first).

I would also recommend creating a bit of weathering on your material in order to get the worn-in look her jacket has. On real leather, this can be done with dye that is lightly dabbed on with a large-hole sponge or a balled-up rag. Be sure to not saturate the sponge very much! On pleather, you can use similar techniques but with paint. Use a brownish yellow base material and then use a reddish brown and a greyish brown in layers (once the previous layer dries) in order to get a similar effect to her vest. You can also add a bit of dye or paint dry brushed into the seams and along areas of wear once the vest is sewn to add a bit more depth.

For her tool pouch,I would look at how actual tool pouches are constructed. Here is a good example. They are generally a rectangle of leather with pockets sewn on the inside and then folded up at the bottom and sewn to create a larger bottom pocket. Experiment with some paper models or pieces of fabric to make sure you have the correct proportions and fully grasp the concept – I have a feeling that once you get it in your hands, it’ll be easier to understand how one goes together. You can then simply sew loops to the top that the belt would thread through.

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff / Twitter

Hello there!

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This question touches on one of my biggest pet peeves, and it is such a huge pet peeve because it makes finding information incredibly difficult for people like you – when people conflate fabric type with fiber type. So first, a short lesson in fabrics, so that you know why people’s recommendations on this are not very good.

When talking about fabrics, there are two main properties that are discussed. One is what the fabric was made out of, and the other is how the fabric was made. The former is referred to as the fiber, and the latter is referred to as the finish, the fabric type, the weave (if it’s a woven fabric), etc. “Cotton,” in this case, is the fiber, but it tells you nothing about what was done to that fiber in order to turn it into a fabric – this would be akin to someone telling you “plastic,” but not specifying if that plastic had been made into a spoon or into a bottle. (Similarly, a spoon – analogous to the finish here – can be made out of many different material types, just like how a particular fabric weave can be made out of multiple fiber types.)

Now, for the answer: cotton is a good fiber to look for when making a lolita-style blouse, so that half of the recommendation is good. Other weaves are also used (chiffon being one of the more popular ones), but for a basic blouse, you are mostly going to be looking at cottons and cotton blends.

When people refer to just plain “cotton,” they are typically talking about a flat weave sheeting. This would be the type of fabric you would find in varying weights and colors in the quilting section of the fabric store, and would be a decent option if you found one with the correct weight for a blouse. I would stay away from the cheapest options and anything that looks too coarse, and instead look for something that has a smooth finish and is medium weight.

I have, in my lolita fashion days, used heavier cotton muslins to great effect, as well. I would recommend that if you are looking to make a white or off-white “natural” blouse.

Cotton or cotton blend sateen would also be a good option if you want something with a little bit more sheen to it, but keeping the same texture. It would be good for a slightly more formal blouse, especially in gothic or classic style. You may find this in the quilting section or in the sportswear section, depending on the fabric store and the weight of the fabric. Sateen is basically the same weave as satin, but it is made from spun fibers (like cotton) rather than extruded fibers (like polyester or silk) so that it has less of a shine to it, fyi.

Another good option would be a cotton poplin, which is often used for dress shirts and has a slightly corded texture to it. If you don’t mind the blouse being slightly sheer, a cotton batiste would also be an option.

Most of these fabrics also come in stretch varieties, which aren’t going to be as stretchy as a knit, but have a bit of spandex fiber mixed in to allow the material a bit of give. This helps with comfort when wearing, so don’t be afraid of these. You may also come across cotton/polyester blends, which are good when you want the fabric to resist wrinkles but still have the overall look and feel of a 100% cotton material. 

When you’re in a fabric store, an employee would be able to point you towards any of these materials if you end up not being able to find them yourself. I would recommend touching all of the fabrics and draping them over your hand to make sure it’s what you want before buying.

I hope that helps! Good luck. :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff / Twitter

Hello there!

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One lucky thing about cosplaying such an iconic outfit is that a lot of fans have already done breakdowns of the outfit, and the original costume has been on display at museums, leading to high-quality reference images. 

This one is very detailed, and breaks down the fabrics used quite nicely.

If you didn’t mind not being completely accurate to the original materials, but wanted something easier to work with and less delicate, I would replace the plastic film with iridescent mirror organza. It would have a very similar appearance, but it won’t tear or shred as easily as the original plastic material.

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff / Twitter

Hello there!

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There are multiple pros and cons to using clip-on ponytails, and whether you use them or not depends on what you are comfortable with and the effect you want.

Clip on ponytails:- Easier to deal with for detangling/storage, since they can be removed- Can help keep your wig on your head better if you clip them through the wig and into your hair- Typically cheaper and easier to find- Easier to style, no need to worry about sagging “bag hair” in the back- More versatile, in that the base wig can be nearly anything, you don’t need to worry about head size, etc.- Often fuller ponytails than with built-in ponytails because of the bulk of the clip- Often less realistic than a wig styled into ponytails because of the bulk of the clip/how the clip attaches (hair coming downward instead of out from the head)- Often less realistic than a wig styled into ponytails because the base wig is usually just a short wig and not a wig parted for pigtails (though this can be changed if you get a parted wig or modify your wig to have a part)

Styled ponytails:- Often more realistic because the hair appears to be coming out of the head rather than a separate piece- Typically better with shorter pigtails and thinner pigtails

Personally, I love the look of styled ponytails, since they look far more realistic. However, for a wig as long as Miku’s and with that style of ponytail (a lot of modern moe-type designs are drawn with the ponytails situated downwards rather than sticking out of the head), I would highly recommend clip-ons because you can get the volume you need, help keep the wig maintained easier, and help keep the wig on your head easier. It’ll also be much cheaper than trying to get a wig that is long enough to have styled-in ponytails that are long enough, since it’s much cheaper and easier to manufacture the clips!

What I would do is look into going for the best of both worlds, which is getting a base wig that is parted for twintails and then adding clips on top of that. It might take some styling work (you maybe have to part it, sew in wefts to cover the wig structure, and then stub the hair yourself), but it will have a more realistic look. If you don’t have confidence in your wig styling skills or don’t mind the look of a short wig that isn’t parted, then I would go with the clip-on ponytails. If the video tutorial of a wig being parted and having wefts sewn in for pigtails isn’t clear enough on this point, you can’t just part a regular wig into pigtails because the direction of the rows of hair (the wefts) is incorrect for that style, and it would show where the wefts are sewn to the base if you tried.

Alternatively, here’s a method of parting a wig to my clip-on ponytails look more realistic that doesn’t involve stubbing.

I would also recommend getting net covers for your ponytails, which become nearly invisible in photos but help keep your pigtails nice and neat and prevent tangling. Assist sells them in Miku color for this reason!

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff / Twitter