Category: cosplay

I want to cosplay jareth from labyrinth (his outfit from the ballroom scene) and I found a fabric that is the perfect color and texture for his jacket, the only problem is that it has 4 way stretch. Is there a way I could make this work? Could I line it with a sturdy non-stretch fabric so it doesn’t stretch? Or would the outer layer eventually stretch out of shape?

Hello there!

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You can do this with 4-way stretch if you do a few things to it first. Given the nature of the outfit, I am assuming this is a stretch fabric that has very good recovery, like a mid-weight spandex knit. If the fabric doesn’t have good recovery (the ability to snap back into shape easily after it has been stretched), then sagging will be more of an issue.

The first thing I would do is add fusible interfacing to the back of each fabric piece. This will help hold the fabric in place without stretching so that when you sew it, you won’t have to worry as much about sagging. Don’t get an interfacing that is too stiff, but just enough to give a bit of body to the fabric and to prevent stretch. Test a few out to see how the adhesion is to a stretch fabric (you may end up using a stretch interfacing with the less stretchy direction going vertically to help with adhesion and to prevent it from stretching under its own weight).

The next thing I would do is flat line all of the pieces in a non-stretch fabric. This is a process where you sew an exact duplicate of your pieces to the back, keeping your stitching inside the seam allowance and being sure to sew all the way around. It is commonly used to add a bit of body or structure to lightweight fabrics, and here, it will prevent your fabric from stretching.

Once you sew the jacket, I would recommend lining it in a non-stretch fabric as well. This will make it so that when you put the jacket on and take it off, the stress of that will largely be going towards that non-stretch fabric, and the outer fabric will stay intact.

Be careful when washing as to not stretch the garment too much, and lay it flat to dry. If you feel the need to reinforce any seams, you can add twill tape or ribbon to them while sewing, which will prevent the seams from stretching out.

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff / Twitter

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hello!! i want to cosplay muichirou tokitou from kimetsu no yaiba, but i’m having trouble with his hair. he has mostly black hair but it’s a light blue/teal at the bottom, and it doesn’t seem possible to dye a black synthetic wig to a lighter color. would i have to start with a white/blonde wig and dye the whole thing from scratch, or is it possible to do it another way? thank you in advance!

Hello there!

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I can see two ways of going about this.

One would be to get a black wig and add the blue wefts to the underside, making sure to trim the black hair in a way that allows the blue hair to show in a gradient like the reference. This would be the easiest way to do it if you don’t want to deal with dyes and would create a very clean-looking effect, but wouldn’t be 100% accurate because of the layering required.

The other would be to dye the wig by hand. You would start with a blue wig and then either dip dye it to get the black on the top or you would hand color it with alcohol ink or alcohol-based markers. Dip dye would be a more stable way of dyeing the wig and could potentially produce a darker/truer black, but would potentially be difficult to control, and you may run into issues with the amount of heat and time that dyeing wigs with polyester-safe fabric dye requires. Hand coloring the wig has the possibility of the dye rubbing off or staining, especially if you use any sort of styling products on the wig after, but would allow you to have more control over where the color goes.

If you do the dye method, be sure to get a wig that can handle whatever dye method you choose, as some fibers don’t accept some types of dye, and you don’t want to accidentally frizz your wig by sticking it in dye that is hotter than the fibers can take.

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff / Twitter

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cutegeekygirls: Jill Valentine/RE3 by Kay Bea…

cutegeekygirls:

Jill Valentine/RE3 by Kay Bear
Source: Cute Geeky Girls

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neko-cosplay-girls: [Self] Azur Lane Atago an…

neko-cosplay-girls:

[Self] Azur Lane Atago and Takao cosplay by Mimi Chan and Me

Hi! I’m new to making my own cosplay, this is my first time doing it all myself. Unfortunately, I’ve hit a few road blocks as I’m preparing to make it. I’m trying to make Glimmer from the new She-Ra, and her boots are peculiar and I’m not sure how to go about making them at all. Do you have any suggestions for a process I could use for her boots?

Hello there!

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There are two major ways to go about making cosplay boots: one is to paint an existing pair of boots, and the other is to make bootcovers. For this project, I would recommend bootcovers, since you can get the correct seaming.

There are a large number of bootcover tutorials on the website, but I’ll briefly go over the method that I would recommend for this.

For something with complicated seaming like this, I would recommend doing the leg wrap method of patterning. You will cover your leg and your base shoe in a layer of saran wrap and then a layer of duct tape (or just a few layers of Glad Press N Seal wrap, if you don’t need it to be super sturdy). Once your leg is wrapped, draw your seamlines on the duct tape with a permanent marker. I would recommend doing the purple seamlines and ignoring the blue swirl for now, unless you feel confident enough to do the more complicated seaming required. You will end up with a toe piece, the top band, a front piece, and a back piece, likely with a seam up the back so it can fit around your ankle. Label these and cut them apart.

You will then add seam allowance to the pieces and cut them out of your fabric – light blue for the toe (which may require a seam or a dart up it to get the curve), light purple for the band and for the back, and dark purple for the front. I would recommend a stretch fabric that doesn’t fray, like a matte miliskin.

If you are attaching the shoes inside permanently, you can simply keep some of the length at the bottom around the sole. If you want to be able to slip out your shoes, be sure that your pattern includes the sole, as well.

Sew these pieces together, and attach your sole as needed. If you are glueing the covers to your shoes, slash the bottom like you are clipping curves while sewing and glue, and then glue a separate sole piece on top. If not, you can add non-slip fabric (often sold in the baby section of the fabric store – this is the stuff for making sure footie pajamas don’t slip) to the bottom, add a dense foam or leather sole piece (glued on), or you can add puffy paint or hot glue dots and swirls for grip.

For the blue swirl up the leg, if you are confident in piecing the bootcovers together, you already included them in the pattern and they are done. If not, you will create a separate pattern for them and attach them on top. Personally, I would glue them, but you can also applique them (sew them on top) once the bootcovers are mostly assembled but the sole is not finished yet. Do the same for the crescent moons.

And congrats! You will have some nice bootcovers for your costume! It may take a bit of practice, so if this is your first time making something like this, I would recommend getting extra fabric so you can make a mockup.

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff / Twitter

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Cosplay Kasumi