Category: fabrickindfriday

Hi! I’m planning on cosplaying chun li and I don’t really know how to make the skirt/bottom part, I want the side slits to show alot of skin and all the tutorials I’ve seen didn’t really cover the side slit skirt look that I’m looking for. Help!

Hello there!

There are a couple of ways to go about this, but the easiest would be to choose a pattern that already has side seams on the skirt, modify the shape slightly, and then simply not sew the seams up all the way.

This would involve making a mockup where you can figure out where the slits need to hit on your hips, marking that point, and then making the seams below that point straight rather than curved. Typically, skirt seams (even on a mostly straight-fitting skirt) are curved to accommodate for hips, but since Chun Li’s outfit has the large slits with her hips poking out from the sides, changing this shape to be a straight line (meeting the bottom of the skirt at a 90° angle) rather than a curved line will create that effect when the seams above that portion are sewn. 

This would be a matter of simply taking a long ruler, drawing a line straight down from the point you want the slit to hit, and removing that portion of the pattern, then not sewing the seam below that part. You will have to line, face, or hem the slit opening so that you don’t have raw edges, keep in mind. You can possibly do this (depending on the version you are doing) by sewing the raw edge into the gold trim. 

I wouldn’t recommend going too far above your natural waist for the slit, since that would mess with the curve and fit of the garment due to it needing to flare back out above the waist to accommodate your ribs. It’s possible, but a bit more advanced.

The harder way to go about this would be if you wanted the side seams moved more towards the front of the garment, like in some references.  This would involve combining the front and back patterns at the side there and blending them together, and then creating your new seam more towards the front. This is a more advanced patterning technique, however, and not how most skirts with this style of slit would be made in real life (front and side front slits are usually patterned differently).

When making this, be sure to have the proper undergarments for the high slit, as well. I would recommend high-cut seamless panties in a color close to your skin tone, dance tights, and then decorative high-cut briefs over the tights, in that order. The seamless, high-cut underwear should blend well under the tights in case it peeks past the edge of the decorative undies, and the decorative briefs will not only give you the canon appearance of her briefs (usually drawn as the same shade of blue as her dress), but will prevent it from looking like you are flashing people when you move.  Here is a tutorial on how to make custom high-waisted briefs.

If there is a more specific look you are going for, feel free to drop some images in the submit so that I can help with that.

I hope that helps! Good luck. :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff

Hi! So I’ll be cosplaying Victor from Yuri on ice very soon, and I’d like to know how can I style the wig to look like his. I bought one that has the hair towards the front but if I try to give it some volume shows the start of the wig (a beige strip) very clearly, and since it’s not a lace front I don’t know how I can make it look better, any suggestions? Thanks!!

Hello there!

There are a few things you can do to change the hairline or to help mitigate the issue of the edge of the wig showing.

Perhaps the most time-consuming and expensive, but also the most realistic, would be to ventilate the wig and turn it into a lace front. This involves adding a strip of wig lace to the front and typing the hairs on yourself. Here is a tutorial, but there are many many more out there. The advantage of this is that you can get the natural-looking hairline that a lace front wig provides, but keep in mind that there is a high startup cost (though once you have a supply of wig lace and the needles, the cost per wig goes down drastically) and that it takes a lot of time.

Another option would be to do a glued hairline. This involves gluing a bit of loose wig fiber to the front of the wig in a way that imitates hair growing out of the scalp. For a wig like Victor’s, this might be overkill, as it tends to look best with heavily styled wigs rather than natural-looking styles, but it is much cheaper than ventilating a lace front, and may take you less time. This is also something that needs to be fit exactly to your own hairline and head shape, or else it won’t sit right. Here is a tutorial, but again, there are many more out there.

If the wig is constructed in a way that doesn’t have the front wefts wrapping up and around the front beige strip, you can also sew a weft or two underneath the front of the wig, hanging downward, so that when the hair is pushed up and back, it covers the edge a little better.

Your third option would be to leave the wig as-is, but to make it so that the strip is less visible. You can do this with a bit of styling – making sure that when you style the front of the wig, you don’t pull the wig fibers up too far in the front, and adding volume further back instead, and making sure that the bang in the front hangs down over the hairline if possible – but mostly this is done in the wearing of the wig. If you use a little spirit gum or lacefront tape on the hairline, it will help hold that area down to your forehead, and will make the beige strip less likely to pull up and show. This is the least realistic of your options, as you aren’t changing the hairline at all, but it requires little to no extra effort or cost on your part, and will help in a pinch.

Regardless of method you use, make sure that you glue or tape the wig’s hairline to your skin so that it stays in place without lifting away or shifting, which will also ruin the illusion of the wig.

I hope that helps! Good luck. :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff

Hello everyone!This is a quick update on the status of your Q&A staff member on this blog. As…

Hello everyone!

This is a quick update on the status of your Q&A staff member on this blog. As you may have noticed, the ‘Fridays with Fabrickind’ feature has lapsed somewhat in recent months. This is not due to a lack of interest, or not wanting to answer your questions, but rather an inability on my part to have time and energy to answer.

Over the past few months, I’ve had some major life changes, including a changing work situation that leaves me with less time on Fridays to answer questions, and some chronic illness issues, which has left me with little energy for answering cosplay help questions, as much as I would love to be able to.

Know that this is not me stepping down as staff – I love this blog and I love helping everyone – but rather an apology for my inactivity, as well as an official notice of the reasons why so that all of you lovely cosplayers don’t think that you’ve been abandoned. Know that I’m trying my best to answer the questions I can, but often, I simply can’t answer any.

I’ll be back to regular question answering once I’m able to get the issues preventing me from doing so currently under control.

Thank you for your understanding, and happy costuming!!

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff

Hello! I’m Morgan! I started following you not too long ago and I’m very impressed with your blog. I just wanted to ask. More than anything in the world, I want to be a cosplayer. However, I just have no idea where to start. It all seems to daunting, it’s terrifying really. Im at such a loss, and I just really want the satisfaction of making my own costume. Of just going. “I made this.” Is there anything you can offer to help me? Thank you so much!

Hello there!

Cosplay can seem pretty daunting before you start, but if you break it into smaller bits or start with small things, you’ll be able to start before you know it.

As with anything, learning to craft your own cosplays takes time and practice. Almost no one is able to whip out amazing and complicated cosplays on their first try. There’s two components to this: practicing and working your way up to more complex costumes, and having patience with your own learning.

I would start small. Is there a costume you want to do where you can make some components and buy or modify others? Or a cosplay with a relatively simple garment that you can make, like a shift dress? If you have someone who can teach you to sew, or a way to take sewing lessons (look at fabric stores, local parks districts and libraries, and local community colleges for classes), that will get you started a lot faster and easier than learning on your own. If you don’t have anyone to teach you, start with a beginner-level pattern and watch video tutorials on how to operate your sewing machine.

As for starting a cosplay, it helps to break down all of the components and figure out what they are before you begin. A lot of costumes aren’t practical for daily wear and have a lot of unusual detailing, so making a list or sketching out all of the pieces can help you with not only keeping track of each item, but also so that you can look at the costume not as a big, daunting entire Thing, but instead as “pleated skirt” and “button-up blouse,” etc. You can then take it slowly and tackle each item one at a time rather than getting overwhelmed by the whole.

Once you gain more experience, you’ll start to figure out a good workflow and order of operations for each costume you do, as well. Since this varies by costume and personal working style, I can’t help you much with that,  but it’s something that will come with experience. 

As for the steps of starting on a costume, I give panels on this subject! Here is the powerpoint.

Mostly, it’s about hanging in there, choosing a costume that will teach you skills but also not be too difficult as to frustrate you, and starting small. I believe in you! We all have to start somewhere, after all.

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff

Hi! I’m a totally new cosplayer, and I’m currently working on Daenerys Targaryen’s blue embroidered dress. I can do the embroidery just fine, but I’m very nervous about putting the actual garment together and having it fit well. The dress seems to have a lot of structure in it. Do you have any tips for good, clean, form-fitting sewing, and any tips for putting boning/structure into a dress?

Hello there!

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When making anything that needs to have perfect fit, I will always recommend making a mockup. Or several mockups, because you might need them. When doing your mockups, be sure to mark any fit issues, correct for them, transfer them to your pattern, and then do another mockup before doing the final outfit. This will ensure a good fit.

Check for any signs that it is too large (gapping, fabric standing away from the body, etc.) or too small (fabric pulling in horizontal wrinkles, etc.), or the wrong shape (this is harder to determine, but make sure that the bust curve is correct and sits at your bust curve, make sure the neckline shape is correct, etc.), and correct these when possible.

You can also practice with your structure on a mockup, which will help with both technique and with making sure that it fits once the structure is inside.

For something like this, most of your work is going to be in the tailoring, not in the interior, though some interior structure will help. If you look at the worn photo, the dress appears to be structured through the torso, underneath the breasts and above the waist. You can use a firmer interlining to help keep that shape (something like a silk organza or a hair canvas will get the structure without a lot of bulk). Using a fusible interfacing on the fashion fabric would also create more structure in that area, though I would recommend the interlining.

There is quite possibly boning in the dress underneath the darts, starting at the waist and ending at the underbust. I would do spiral steel boning there, at the side seams, and in the same location in the back. Attach your boning channels to an interior layer so that they hide better. You can do a mockup with cheap plastic boning or with plastic cable ties to make sure you have the placement and fit right before proceeding.

I would guess that this has bra cups built in, though I can’t see the inside to know for sure.

Mostly, this is going to be a project that requires practice. Be sure to cut your pieces well with sharp scissors, and be sure to sew your seams nice and straight, and to press them when you are done. It may help to have a dressform that you can drape this on in the patterning phase, or have a friend help you pin it while worn, so that you can get the fit just right. 

Also, if you can find notes from the costumers or photographs of the inside of the dress, that will help quite a bit. Look around for GoT-specific costuming sites to see if that is available.

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff

I have a question about wig spiking. How do you know when you should make a foam core/insert to help with stability? Im making a Joseph Joestar wig from Jojos (his brown hair with the big front spike) and I have no idea if I should try and make a support inside?

Hello there!

image

Nice!

When trying to decide between regular spiking and foamcore spiking, there’s a few things you can keep in mind. I’ll break down the differences, and hopefully that can help you decide.

Foamcore:
This is good for outlandish, gravity-defying styles. If it is something that is very clean-looking or cartoony, you can get smoother shapes and more complex shapes with foamcore. Foamcore is also a more permanent method, so if you want the wig to stay in place for a long period with minimal touchup, it’s a good method. I personally find it harder to do than traditional spiking, but that depends on your particular set of skills.

Spiking:
This would be the traditional method of using some type of glue or heavy-duty hairspray, some light teasing, and a hairdryer to spike wig fibers without internal support. This provides a more realistic look, since you are using the wig’s own fiber for support and not a smooth interior piece. You can also do more realistic spiking on the rest of the wig to match, but it is much harder to get good-looking absurd anime spikes with this method. This is best with a wig with grippy fibers, rather than smooth and silky fibers. The other part of this is that if the hair can’t support itself when you try traditional spiking, you will need a support. this is also less permanent, which means that you can possibly wash and reuse the wig, but you may have to do more touchup down the road.

With both methods, you may have to do some dewefting and/or rewefting, depending on the arrangement and density of wefts in your base wig, so that the netting doesn’t show.

For this particular costume, I’d say that you can go either way. If you are amping up the cartoony elements, that will be easier to do with foamcore, and if you are going for a more realistic hair look, that will be easier with traditional spiking. 

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff 

Hi there! I’m planning on cosplaying Motoko Kusanagi from Ghost in The Shell and I would really like to try to make my own thermoptic suit (specifically the one used in the 2017 live action movie). Do you have any suggestion? I was thinking to use a nude colored morphsuit as a base and then sew over it but I’m not really sure. Greetings from Italy!

Hello there!

The suit from the movie was cast in silicone. You can see the costumers talking about the suit in this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nbCyXVEVpKk

(It won’t let me embed it, so there’s the link)

However, this is likely not feasible unless you have access to industrial shop equipment, so here are some alternatives.

You can possible sew over a morphsuit. I would recommend creating a layer underneath that has a bit of loft so that when you sew through it, it creates a slight “pillowing” effect that allows for it to imitate the sections of the original suit. Alternatively, you can use a material that already gives this effect when topstitched, such as a spacer fabric. (I know that Spandex World should carry this in a beige ‘nude’ that will work if you are light skinned, though I’m not sure about shipping to Italy)

You can also use a combination of fabric and latex to get a similar texture effect. I would experiment with brushing liquid latex over a fabric suit to get the texture. You can use something to block the latex and build up a few layers for the areas with sections.

If you wanted to go with the classic 1995 film suit, I would recommend a skin tone bodysuit with a looser-fitting bodysuit of a material like glisenette over it, to create the look of having a translucent layer over a nude body.

As always with this type of costume, be sure to check with your local conventions for their rules of nudity and faux-nudity. Even if you’re fully covered, some cons don’t allow for costumes that make you appear nude or partially nude, so check on that before you invest in your costume.

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff

I really want to cosplay Nico Robin’s timeskip outfit from out piece but I’m having a lot of trouble with the skirt, I can’t seem to figure out what kind of fabric I should make her beach wrap out of without it being too stiff or cheap looking. Do you have any ideas that could help me? Thanks ahead of time

Hello there!

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This is one of those few places where you can go with either a woven fabric or a knit fabric and it’ll still work with the garment. Which you choose would depend on what look you want and what you are comfortable working with.

If you want a woven fabric, look for something that is lightweight with a good drape and a soft hand. Peachskin might work, or a lightweight crepe, or a fine linen, or if you don’t mind it being a little sheer, a cotton lawn or voile might work.

I would stay away from things like quilting cotton for this, since it won’t have the correct drape. I wouldn’t do anything as light as a chiffon. Rayon, linen, silk, or nylon content would be good, some finer cottons, and some polyesters. 

For anything you try, be sure to either drape it over your arm or get a swatch (if shopping online) and try draping that over your finger to see how it behaves and what kinds of wrinkles it breaks into. If you want added flow, cut it or drape it so that the fabric hangs on the bias rather than on the grain.

I think that for this, however, I would personally use a lightweight knit. It may not be as accurate to what that type of garment would be made of in real life, but it would get the kind of drape you are looking for. Something like a jersey would work, though it tends to curl at the edges. A plain spandex knit might actually be a good option here, as weird as it sounds. Also, look at stretch microsuede and turn it to the backside and see how it looks – it’ll likely have a soft sheen to it, and while it’s a bit heavier than the other options here, it should drape nicely. You want something that’s lightweight, but has enough weight to hang down under its own weight, rather than floating or rustling, if that makes sense.

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff

Im trying to learn about resin casting and how to make your own designs. do you have any tutorials on casting? just trying to learn the basics

Hello there!

Resin tutorials are this way!

Hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff

Hello! Im going to be cosplaying The Final Pamfrim in a couple months and she’s a character with a lot of rough skin and scars. Can you point me in the direction of any costume makeup tips or tutorials I can use to try and replicate those effects?? (This blog is so helpful, i love it) Thank you!!

Hello there!

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We have a bunch of scar tutorials over here. For this character, I would recommend a combination of colored makeup and rigid collodion. This is a product that is brushed onto skin and as it dries, it shrinks in a way that, when combined with makeup, creates realistic-looking ‘rough skin’ type scars. It takes a little practice, but is relatively beginner-friendly, and would be great for the scars on her cheeks. If you want a more intense peeling skin look, liquid latex is a good option.

I hope that helps! Good luck :]

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff